Petrochemical

Resins

Resins

Resin, any natural or synthetic organic compound consisting of a noncrystalline or viscous liquid substance. Natural resins are typically fusible and flammable organic substances that are transparent or translucent and are yellowish to brown in colour. They are formed in plant secretions and are soluble in various organic liquids but not in water. Synthetic resins comprise a large class of synthetic products that have some of the physical properties of natural resins but are different chemically. Synthetic resins are not clearly differentiated from plastics.

Natural resins may be classified as spirit-soluble and oil-soluble. Among the former are balsams, long popular as a healing agent; turpentines used as solvents; and mastics, dragon’s blood, dammar, sandarac, and the lacs, all used as components of varnishes. The oil-soluble resins include rosin, derived along with turpentine from the long-leaf pine and long used for a variety of applications, including soapmaking; copals, used in varnishes; amber, the hardest natural resin, fabricated into jewelry; Oriental lacquer, derived from a tree native to China; and cashew-nutshell oil, derived from cashew nuts.

In modern industry natural resins have been almost entirely replaced by synthetic resins, which are divided into two classes, thermoplastic resins, which remain plastic after heat treatment, and thermosetting resins, which become insoluble and infusible on heating.

Read 1404 times Last modified on Thursday, 01 February 2018 17:04
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